The Cowdung – Fly Tying Classic Winged Wet Flies

Mentioned as far back as Isaak Walson’s “Compleat Angler” of 1653, the Cowdung is a true classic fly. Tied to imitate the Yellow Cowdung Fly, this terrestrial pattern can effectively be fished as a wet fly in streams wherever cow pastures are close by.

Hook: #10-16 1x long wet fly
Thread: Black
Tag: Gold tinsel
Body: Rabbit dubbing, olive and orange mixed
Throat: Hackle fibers, light brown or ginger
Wing: Mottled turkey slip

This pattern can be found in David Klausmeyer’s “Favorite Flies” published in 2020, and available here: https://amzn.to/3oeSNMa

Savage Flies is a project with the mission of encouraging and teaching fly tying to as many people as possible. The channel is named after one of my western Maryland homewaters, the Savage River. I’ve been uploading at least three new videos a week (usually Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday).

Author: Matt O

2 thoughts on “The Cowdung – Fly Tying Classic Winged Wet Flies

  1. Just found your great web site and YouTube channel, its great and I am encouraged by your enthusiasm on the art of fly dressing
    I have been fly dressing for about seven years, not constantly but just from time to time.
    Your videos have really rekindled my desire to dress flies after a few months of a lull.
    My fishing has been in the rivers of Yorkshire and Scotland. So I am very very fortunate to have the experience of fishing in some of the meccas of the British isles for brown trout. While using the flies I have dressed myself, cant think of any thing better, can you ?
    Mu interests have become centered on classic wet flies and Catskill dry’s, so your site has really helped with my decision to dust off my vise and get tying again.
    Thank you.

    1. Bryan,
      Thanks so much for the kind words. I really appreciate you taking the time to leave a note. I’m glad to hear you’re dusting off your vise and getting back into tying! I myself took a couple of decades off but can tell you I am having a lot of fun with it this second go-around. I think part of it is all the excellent resources available now on the internet. It wasn’t quite like this thirty years ago.
      Cheers,
      Matt

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